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Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:

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2 months 1 week ago #145128 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
:) = ;)

This is kind of GOOD NEWS for the Water Protectors:

Federal Judge Says Dakota Access Pipeline Environmental Review Was Inadequate
June 14, 2017

www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=16176

Washington, DC – Federal judge James Boasberg today partially sided with the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes in their ongoing lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers regarding the approval of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

In December 2016: www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=11803 , the Army Corps of Engineers suspended approval of the Dakota Access Pipeline’s crossing under Lake Oahe near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation in North Dakota, saying that they needed to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). However once Donald Trump was inaugurated as president, he ordered: www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=12650 the Army Corps to approve the pipeline without an EIS, which it promptly did: www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=13272

Since then, much of the legal battle over the pipeline has focused on whether this expedited approval by the Army Corps without an EIS was improper.

The Dakota Access Pipeline officially began moving oil to market on June 1, 2017, and had at least three oil spills: www.unicornriot.ninja/?p=15361 during pre-startup operations.

In today’s ruling: ecf.dcd.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/show_public_doc?2016cv1534-239 , Judge Boasberg found that the Army Corps review of DAPL’s potential impacts to wildlife, hunting and fishing rights, and the environment did not fulfill their obligations under the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA).

“…Standing Rock and Cheyenne River…seek summary judgment on several counts related to the Corps’ alleged failure to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act. In particular, the Tribes believe that the Corps did not sufficiently consider the pipeline’s environmental effects before granting permits to Dakota Access to construct and operate DAPL under Lake Oahe, a federally regulated waterway.

…Although the Corps substantially complied with NEPA in many areas, the Court agrees that it did not adequately consider the impacts of an oil spill on fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice, or the degree to which the pipeline’s effects are likely to be highly controversial.


The court’s finding that the Army Corps did not meet their obligations under environmental law means that it is possible (but not certain) that a future court ruling could order Energy Transfer Partners to shut down the pipeline.

To remedy those violations, the Corps will have to reconsider those sections of its environmental analysis upon remand by the Court. Whether Dakota Access must cease pipeline operations during that remand presents a separate question of the appropriate remedy, which will be the subject of further briefing.


The next court date in the case is a June 21 status conference, and no further rulings are expected before that date.

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2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #145131 by terr-y
terr-y replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
The Standing Rock Sioux Claim ‘Victory and Vindication’ in Court
www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017...ictory-court/530427/

A federal judge rules that the Dakota Access pipeline did not receive an adequate environmental vetting.
Little Thunder, a traditional Lakota dancer and indigenous activists, protests outside the White House in March. Kevin Lamarque / Reuters





A federal judge ruled in favor of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe on Wednesday, handing the tribe its first legal victory in its year-long battle against the Dakota Access pipeline.

James Boasberg, who sits on D.C. district court, said that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers failed to perform an adequate study of the pipeline’s environmental consequences when it first approved its construction. In a 91-page decision, the judge cited the Corps’ study of “the impacts of an oil spill on fishing rights, hunting rights, or environmental justice” as particularly deficient, and he ordered it to prepare a new report on its risks.

The court did not, however, order the pipeline to be shut off until a new environmental study is completed—a common remedy when a federal permit is found lacking. Instead, Boasberg asked attorneys to appear before him again and make a new set of arguments about whether the pipeline should operate.

The tribe faces a mixed result: The ruling may establish some important precedents, particularly around environmental justice and treaty rights. But there’s no indication that the requirement to perform a new study will alter the outcome of the case—or even get the pipeline switched off in the interim.

“This is a a very significant victory and vindication of the tribe’s opinion,” said Jan Hasselman, the lead attorney for the case and an employee of Earthjustice, an environmental-advocacy group that represented the Standing Rock Sioux.

“The court slices things pretty thin, but there were three major areas that he found deficient, and they’re not insignificant. They’re central to the problems that we’ve been highlighting the whole time,” Hasselman told me.

Energy Transfer Partners, which owns and operates the pipeline, did not respond to a request for comment before publication. A representative for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could not be reached.

The Dakota Access pipeline runs 1,100 miles across much of the Great Plains, connecting the Bakken oil formation in North Dakota to a refinery and second pipeline in Illinois. Oil began flowing through the pipeline earlier this month.

The pipeline became a rallying point for both climate activists and indigenous civil-rights advocates last year, as thousands of people—many of them Native Americans—gathered on the Standing Rock reservation to protest and physically obstruct the pipeline’s construction. By late October, Standing Rock had become the largest and most high-profile Native protest in the United States in four decades.

Boasberg’s ruling centered on two ways that the Corps’s environmental study was inadequate. First, he said, the Standing Rock Sioux are assured certain hunting and fishing rights in their most recent treaty with the U.S. government. Many of the tribe’s members rely on fish or hunted game as a steady food source.

Before approving the pipeline, the Corps did not study whether an oil spill at the pipeline would kill most of the river’s fish. It also did not report on whether the chemicals used to clean up a spill could poison local game, rendering them unfit for human consumption

“Even though a spill is not certain to occur at Lake Oahe, the Corps still had to consider the impacts of such an event on the environment,” the judge said.



This emphasis on consideration points to the broader nature of the legal fight: This case is not about how the pipeline may harm Standing Rock, but whether the Corps adequately studied and reported on those harms before approving it in the first place. Most environmental-law cases in the United States are fought on this kind of procedural territory—it’s a a product of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, which mandates the government study the environmental effects of any decision it makes but does not require it to make especially green decisions.

Boasberg’s second complaint with the Corps was on similar methodological grounds. According to federal regulation, every major project constructed near a poor community, community of color, or Native American reservation must be studied on environmental-justice grounds. The Corps shrugged off many of these rules, arguing that no affected group lived within a half-mile of the pipeline route.

The Corps was technically correct. The Dakota Access pipeline runs 0.55 miles north of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation.

“Federal agencies are given a lot of leeway until they do something that just, on the face of it, seems ridiculous,” says Sarah Krakoff, a law professor at the University of Colorado. “I think that that’s what happened here.”

Boasberg’s decision, she said, had implications far beyond Standing Rock and this particular pipeline dispute.

“In the vernacular, it’s a big deal,” she told me. “It’s an important step for a court to recognize that both environmental-justice claims and the failure to adequately analyze Indian treaty rights can be the basis for the reversal of an agency’s environmental analysis.”

With the project so far along, she said it was unclear if any procedural problem could convince Boasberg to temporarily shut down the project.

The tribe was not successful on every claim. The judge ruled that the Corps did not violate administrative law when it quickly approved the pipeline earlier this year. He has also previously ruled that the Dakota Access pipeline does not infringe on Standing Rock’s cultural heritage, nor does it damage the religious practice of another group of Sioux, the Cheyenne River Tribe.

The complicated legal history of the Dakota Access pipeline has stemmed from one important conflict: The pipeline mostly runs across private land, allowing Energy Transfer Partners to quickly secure permission and construct most of it last year. But it also must cross the Missouri River, a federal waterway controlled by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Therefore the dispute at Standing Rock has played out over the last year as the vast majority of the pipeline stood completed and ready for operation. In late July 2016, the Corps first granted an easement allowing the pipeline’s construction. But less than two months later, in early September, the Obama administration stepped in and asked Energy Transfer Partners to voluntarily stop work on the project. It also announced it was reviewing the Corps’s easement.

President Barack Obama announced the result of this review in early December 2016, when the administration revoked the permit entirely. It also ordered Energy Transfer Partners and the U.S. Army Corps to study whether the pipeline could be re-routed.

Finally, almost two months later and on his fifth day in office, President Donald Trump reversed this order and granted approval for the pipeline.

The president celebrated the pipeline during a speech last week in Cincinnati. “The Dakota Access pipeline is now officially open for business—a $3.8-billion investment in American infrastructure that was stalled,” he said. “Nobody thought any politician would have the guts to approve that final leg. And I just closed my eyes and said: Do it.”

“It’s up, it’s running, it’s beautiful, it’s great. Everybody is happy, the sun is shining, the water’s still clean. When I approved it, I thought I’d take a lot of heat. But I took none, actually none. But I take so much heat for nonsense that it probably overrode the other,” Trump added.

Hasselman referenced the speech as he spoke to me Wednesday. “That’s such a perfect metaphor for this whole process,” he said. “The government closed its eyes to the impacts of this pipeline on the people of Standing Rock—and their history at the hands of the same government.”

David Archambault III, the chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux, told me last week that while he is not ultimately optimistic about the legal battle, he feels duty-bound to pursue it.

“When we first entered into this, we understood the history, we knew the facts, we knew the laws,” he said. “We still have to bring it all up. Because just because [the situation] is legally right, it’s morally and ethically wrong. What happened at Standing Rock is a movement, and you don’t see the benefits of a movement until way later.”
Last Edit: 2 months 1 week ago by terr-y.
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2 months 1 week ago - 2 months 1 week ago #145133 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
This is from my previous post - last-night I tried to post it in the SAME POST, but much to my chagrin I wasn`t able too!!

Those people in the directly above piece that are given the label of 'protester' . Protesting the implementation of the pipeline as being 'protesters'...You know protecting the environment and the water that they depend on to live from contamination (oil spills) do to the implementation (completion... working) of DAPL.

Not to mention that they see themselves as 'protectors' of the Native American TREATY RIGHTS TOO, in particular the Treaty of 1851.

EXPLAINED: Dakota Access Pipeline IS ON Treaty Land
AND

Standing Rock Response to North Dakota Governor's Evacuation Order (11/28/2016)
Please, START this video at the 17:05 mark and STOP-IT at the 23:40 mark...THANKS!!
ALSO

Fort Laramie Treaty, 1851 ARTICLES OF A TREATY
Please, JUMP-TO ARTICLE 5 PARAGRAPH 2 for a WRITTEN DESCRIPTION of the BOUNDRIES:

AS WELL
This is a LINK-TO-A MAP of Sioux Treaty Land As defined in the 1851 Fort Laramie Treaty

http://worldfreemansociety.ca/forum/vntt-study-notes/116058-standing-rock-the-dakota-access-pipeline-protests?start=130#144672

PLUS, JUST PLAIN MORE INFORMATION CAN BE HAD HERE:

http://worldfreemansociety.ca/forum/vntt-study-notes/116058-standing-rock-the-dakota-access-pipeline-protests?start=110#144512


TYT Politics Reporter Jordan Chariton`s #NoDAPL Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqSpk99bLYIRhTrDy1WU4xR5xqTDT4KCP

http://worldfreemansociety.ca/forum/vntt-study-notes/116303-thanksgiving-to-redskins-dispelling-american-myths-that-hide-native-genocide


Now to Finnish my post from my first post of this page:


Standing Rock Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II applauded the ruling:
http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2017/in-victory-for-standing-rock-sioux-tribe-court-finds-that-approval-of-dakota-access-pipeline-violated-the-law

“This is a major victory for the Tribe and we commend the courts for upholding the law and doing the right thing. The previous administration painstakingly considered the impacts of this pipeline, and President Trump hastily dismissed these careful environmental considerations in favor of political and personal interests. We applaud the courts for protecting our laws and regulations from undue political influence and will ask the Court to shut down pipeline operations immediately.”


Jan Hasselman, staff attorney for Earthjustice (an environmental law nonprofit representing the Standing Rock tribe for their DAPL litigation), commented on the historical significance of Judge Boasberg’s decision:
http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2017/in-victory-for-standing-rock-sioux-tribe-court-finds-that-approval-of-dakota-access-pipeline-violated-the-law

“This decision marks an important turning point. Until now, the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have been disregarded by the builders of the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Trump administration—prompting a well-deserved global outcry. The federal courts have stepped in where our political systems have failed to protect the rights of Native communities.”

Last Edit: 2 months 1 week ago by verynewtothis.
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2 months 5 days ago - 2 months 5 days ago #145142 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
;)

ALSO:

As Lakota People's Law Project Chief Counsel Daniel Sheehan continues to prepare for Chase Iron Eyes' upcoming court case, further details continue to come out about the private security firm TigerSwan and their actions surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Published on Jun 14, 2017

Learn more at:
www.lakotalaw.org


Chief Counsel Daniel Sheehan: DAPL and Tigerswan Exposed

https://www.lakotalaw.org/our-campaigns/tigerswan-exposed
Dakota Access, LLC contracted with private, paramilitary organization TigerSwan to surveil and suppress water protectors.

Lakota People's Law Project attorney and water protector Chase Iron Eyes being interviewed by The Intercept at the People's Summit in Chicago.


Published on Jun 12, 2017

Chase faces a felony charge for his protection of Standing Rock's water. Please donate to their legal fund to defend Chase:
https://www.lakotalaw.org/our-actions/legalfund


Chase Iron Eyes Intercept Interview on DAPL

http://hpr1.com/index.php/feature/news/former-dapl-security-speaks-out-damning-tigerswan-tactics/

Speaking from a nondescript hotel room, a former DAPL security employee revealed secret agendas, illegal activities, and widespread drug use among private security employees hired by Energy Transfer Partners to protect the company’s interests along to the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.

Last Edit: 2 months 5 days ago by verynewtothis.
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1 month 4 weeks ago - 1 month 4 weeks ago #145188 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
Who Is Funding the Dakota Access Pipeline?
Bank of America,
HSBC,
UBS,
Goldman Sachs,
Wells Fargo


Published on Sep 9, 2016



DIVEST from The BANKS Starve the Snake:
starvethesnake.com/the-banks

Check out and support Last Real Indians:
lastrealindians.com/

Check out Last Real Indians on Facebook:
www.facebook.com/lastrealindians/


Hey Energy Transfer Partners! How you like them stock prices?!?!?? Yesterday, ETP stock dropped below $20 a share for the first time, keep up the pressure!

Just GOOGLE 'Energy Transfer Partners', its stock price is even lower now.

Last Edit: 1 month 4 weeks ago by verynewtothis.
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1 month 3 weeks ago #145226 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
This is an UPDATE concerning Red Fawn's legal case:

THANK YOU Jordan Chariton FOR THIS UPDATE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Standing Rock Prisoner To Be Released to Halfway House

Published on Jun 27, 2017

TYT Politics Reporter Jordan Chariton ( Twitter.com/JordanChariton ) brings us some promising news for those of you follow Standing Rock --Red Fawn, a water protector who was attacked by police at camp on October 22nd 2016, is going to finally be released to a halfway house. Unfortunately, that doesn't change the fact that an indigenous woman has been in jail for nine months, for supposedly threatening police with a gun....a gun which has never been found .



Watch The Original Arrest Video HERE:


Standing Rock Political Prisoner Red Fawn Needs Your Help

indi.com/freeredfawn

https://www.generosity.com/fundraising/free-red-fawn

https://www.facebook.com/FreeRedFawn/

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1 month 3 weeks ago - 1 month 3 weeks ago #145235 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
This is a partial EXCERPT from here:
worldfreemansociety.ca/forum/vntt-study-...sts?start=160#145128

The next court date in the case is a June 21 status conference, and no further rulings are expected before that date.


UPDATE:

TYT Politics Reporter Jordan Chariton ( Twitter.com/JordanChariton ) gives us an update on what the next steps are moving forward with the Standing Rock lawsuit, according to the attorneys.

Jordan on Next Steps In Standing Rock Lawsuit

Published on Jun 28, 2017



www.facebook.com/dallasgoldtooth/posts/10106879936449013

Dallas Goldtooth
· June 22 at 4:03pm ·
#NoDAPL Update. 6/22/27
Order on Motion for Briefing Schedule
MINUTE ORDER: As discussed at the June 21, 2017, status hearing, the 249 Joint Motion for Briefing Schedule is GRANTED.

The Court ORDERS that:

(1) Opening briefs of no more than 20 pages each shall be submitted by July 17, 2017, by Defendant United States Army Corps of Engineers and Intervenor Defendant Dakota Access;

(2) Responses of no more than 40 pages in total shall be submitted by August 7, 2017, by Plaintiff Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Intervenor Plaintiff Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe;

(3) Any other Intervenor or Consolidated Plaintiff may file a brief up to 10 pages by August 7, 2017, dealing only with issues not raised by Standing Rock and Cheyenne River;

(4) Replies of no more than 10 pages each shall be submitted by August 17, 2017, by the Corps and Dakota Access;

(5) Sur-replies of no more than 20 pages in total shall be submitted by August 28, 2017, by Standing Rock and Cheyenne River; and

(6) Any other Intervenor or Consolidated Plaintiff may file a sur-reply up to 5 pages by August 28, 2017, dealing only with issues not raised by Standing Rock and Cheyenne River.

Signed by Judge James E. Boasberg on 6/20/2017.


https://www.facebook.com/StandingWithStandingRock/posts/1363681460335351

UPDATE:
Earthjustice Attorney Jan Hasselman, representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline, gives an update on the case following the status conference today in Washington, D.C.



native american documentary - Earthjustice Attorney Jan Hasselman, representing the Standing Rock


Read more about the lawsuit:
http://earthjustice.org/features/faq-standing-rock-litigation


corporateconjob.com/
Last Edit: 1 month 3 weeks ago by verynewtothis.
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1 month 2 weeks ago #145278 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
I got this from the 'Last Real Indians` Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/theinterceptflm/posts/1363825933666456

As the pipeline’s construction neared completion, the security company stepped up its efforts to portray the situation as volatile and dangerous.

As Standing Rock Camps Cleared Out, TigerSwan Expanded Surveillance to Array of Progressive Causes
By Alleen Brown, Will Parrish, Alice Speri. On June 21, 2017

https://theintercept.com/2017/06/21/as-standing-rock-camps-cleared-out-tigerswan-expanded-surveillance-to-array-of-progressive-causes/
Please GO TO the LINK directly ABOVE TO READ THIS ARTICLE IN FULL...THANKS!!

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2 weeks 5 days ago - 2 weeks 5 days ago #145317 by verynewtothis
verynewtothis replied the topic: Standing Rock, the Dakota Access Pipeline protests:
:angry:

This is from the FREE Red Fawn`s FaceBook page concerning the release of Red Fawn from prison to a half way house over 30 days ago that is relating to Red Fawn's legal case:
https://www.facebook.com/FreeRedFawn/photos/a.143826326089071.1073741828.143731482765222/297370204068015/?type=3&theater

FREE RED FAWN
267 DAYS OF IMPRISONMENT

Its been 30 days since North Dakota Judge granted Red's release to a half way house. Yet she remains in Jail.
Please continue to send her prayers, love & positive energy ❤️❤️❤️❤️

Red Fawn is still facing 10 years to life in prison for protecting water. This is an uphill battle for her freedom. Please continue to support her legal fund @ https://www.generosity.com/fundraising/red-fawn-legal-fund


And:

https://www.facebook.com/FreeRedFawn/posts/301090083696027

Red Fawn is asking if people can text her. She is still in jail but has access to text. Her number is 701-368-4176. She sends everyone love and says she's thankful for all the support.

Phone cards can be purchased thru www.reliancetelephone.com HOWEVER you must remember to save the ten digit pin as they only give it to you once. (PIN numbers can be messaged to her at number above)


#FreeRedFawn:
https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/freeredfawn?source=feed_text&story_id=301090083696027
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